Tag Archives: Athletic Trainers

Virginia HS Junior Reflects On “The Journey”

{Editor’s note:  When we tell our stories, it’s as much to get them off our chest as it is to release the regret that we feel for having done something to ourselves that likely could have turned out differently if we knew ahead of time that suffering like this was even remotely possible. Marissa is very eloquent in this piece, but what should not be lost while reading it is the very real physical and emotional pain that she still feels to this day. Saving others the expense of dealing with this pain is a common thread in all of our experiences. These stories are all here for a reason. Heed them. –Jay}

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Marissa, left, and friend

By Marissa Flora

“Invincible,” the word that would rush through my head each time I stepped out on the field.  It was a reminder that I would never be the one to get hurt, and if I did, I somehow convinced myself that I could play through anything and I would be just fine.  These days, that idea has changed; “invisible,” is now the word that rushes through my head each time someone does not ask, “What’s wrong?”  No one can see my injury, no one understands what I struggle with to get through the day, and no one knows how much harder I have to work to be successful. Continue reading

Fixing Concussions with Band-Aid’s: How Effective is the NFL’s Defenseless Receiver Rule?

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By Kevin Saum

Improving health and safety in football became a passion of mine after I suffered from second impact syndrome while playing in a high school football game and fell victim to the culture of toughness that exists in all sports. Despite the fact that football nearly took my life, to this day I still love the game and I do not regret one play from my 10 years of participation. Many of my fondest memories are from playing high school football and I credit the game and my coaches for making me the man I am today. Because of the intense passion I have for football, I become infuriated when I see professional players undermining the NFL’s attempts to make the game safer by taking cheap shots on defenseless receivers. Continue reading

Long Island HS Junior Speaks About Loss, and Perseverance in the Wake of PCS

By Kate Gaglias

kategThe saying “You will never know the value of a moment until it becomes a memory” is absolutely true. Many of us athletes take our sports for granted- The grueling practices, running laps for no reason, constant games and tournaments. But the truth is no matter how much we say we hate it we will always have the love for the sport. Until, unfortunately for some of us all of that can be taken away in an instant.

My name is Kate Gaglias, and I am a junior in High school in Long Island, New York. I’ve played soccer since I was four years old, beginning in an in-house league like every other toddler. I joined a travel team when I was eight called the Longwood Twisters (which I am still a part of today) and played on the junior high team, JV team, and in my sophomore year I became a member of our varsity team. But since a young age my life has been changed by concussions. I received my first concussion in 2007 by getting a ball slammed to the side of my head by one of my teammates at an indoor practice. I didn’t feel anything until I got home, and after telling my dad (an athletic trainer) and my mom (a physical therapist assistant), they checked out my symptoms (the normal dizziness, sensitivity to light, headaches) and they all added up to having a mild concussion. I was out of school for a week, and when my symptoms were gone I returned to school like a normal 5th grader. Continue reading

Peter Robinson, Father of Northern Ireland Teen Lost To Second Impact Syndrome in a Rugby Match, Speaks Out

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Benjamin Peter Robinson

Born 29th May 1996 – Died 31st January 2011

By Peter Robinson

Ben, as he was to me, or Benjamin, as he liked to be called, was an A student who had a big broad smile and a wicked sense of humour. A very caring sensitive boy who hated confrontation, he was a mediator. Growing up, Ben loved ‘Harry Potter’ and ‘Lord of the Rings’, playing football and getting up to mischief. He was fanatical about Man Utd and visited Old Trafford and Wembley to see them play with his step father Steven. He would talk endlessly about who was the best player – Scholes, Ronaldo, Messi, Best, Pele. I brought him to see Messi play for Barcelona, it was a great day.

Ben has a sister Holly who lived at home with him. She was studying for her GCSE at the time. Holly continued to attend Carrickfergus Grammar and has shown great strength and courage, gaining all her GCSE and latterly all her A levels. She is now at College, she is sports mad including football and hockey although this gives me many sleepless nights, but at least she knows the dangers of concussion.

Ben has a younger brother Gregor and sister Isla who lives in Scotland with myself and my wife Carol. There is not a day that passes when Ben is not spoken about or watched on home DVD. When we told them what had happened to Ben, my son Gregor said, ‘can we not take the grass out of the ground and put it into Ben to make him grow better?’ If only it was that simple.

Ben also has 2 step sisters- Sian and Dana and they miss him terribly.

Ben was the most loyal child, he adored his mother Karen, they had a great relationship, since Ben’s death she has not been able to work again, any chance at getting her life back on track or a return to a form of normality seems a long way off.

On Saturday 29th January 2011, I knew that Ben was playing a Medallion match at School, I had spoken to him the previous day he was excited and nervous about the game. Late morning Holly telephoned Carol to say that Ben had been injured in the game and an ambulance was taking him to the Royal Victoria Hospital. At that time I thought, “okay its rugby”. I expected him to get injured at some time, a cut, a broken arm, ankle and my worst thought was a broken neck. I immediately booked flights across for myself and Carol, whilst waiting to travel I received telephone calls from Steven saying that Ben had a head injury and things were not looking good. Waiting on that flight was the longest wait of my life. I just wanted to be with my son.

On arrival at the RVH, I knew Ben had been taken to HDU. We spoke with the consultants and I could tell by their manner that things were not good. They told us that Ben had suffered severe head trauma and was highly unlikely to recover. They expected this sort of injury from a car accident and they said recovery would take a miracle. The staff at the HDU were fantastic. They attempted to reduce the swelling in Ben’s brain by using a new cooling method, but unfortunately this did not help. Seeing Ben lying there in the hospital bed and being unable to help him is a parent’s worst nightmare, I could only hold his hand and talk to him.

On the Monday, the consultants spoke to the family and explained that they believed Ben was ‘Brain Stem Dead’ and they carried out tests which confirmed this. We were approached by the Organ Donor team who made a request to the family that as Ben was so fit and healthy he could help others by donating his organs. As a family we agreed that Ben would want to help others. We wanted a miracle, but knew that Ben could be someone else’s miracle by donating. We know that Ben’s organs helped to save 5 others: a little girl Erin who was 6 months received part of his liver and her parents wrote some time later to tell the family that she was doing well. Knowing that Ben has helped others is somewhat comforting.

On the Monday night, Karen (Ben’s mum) and myself sat all night beside him, holding his hand. We did not want to leave him for a moment. Knowing that that night was the last night we could hold our son was devastating.

On Tuesday he was taken away for the organ donation operation. That was the last time I saw my son alive.

On Wednesday I identified my son at the mortuary.

Ben’s funeral was very difficult. The amount of people who came to pay respect to him was beyond comprehension. The school choir sang at the funeral and they were amazing, singing whilst tears ran freely down their little faces. The headmaster told tales from Ben’s friends, we had music, photos, and I laughed and cried. The school rugby team carried his coffin out of the church and through the streets of Carrickfergus.
Some months later we were contacted by the State Pathologist Jack Crane and he told the family that the findings in relation to Ben’s cause of death were ‘Second Impact Syndrome’. Having never heard this before, he explained that Ben had suffered several concussions during the one match.

As there was a video of the match, we watched this and saw many incidents where Ben had been injured and was seen on many occasions holding his head.

As a family, we wanted to find out what had happened, what had went wrong, and why did no one know about this syndrome? We wanted to make sure that this could not happen again.

We could not get Ben’s death certificate until the Coroner had carried out an inquest into his death. Unfortunately, as time passed, Ben’s team mates were still traumatised by his death and when they found out that it was mismanaged concussion they were devastated knowing that if they had been aware of the signs and symptoms of concussion they would have highlighted it.

The police investigation was long and painstaking and many mistakes were made. The family had to instruct a lawyer to assist with the investigation.

A chance meeting at Ben’s grave between Karen and a school friend led to valuable information coming to light: Ben had been injured several times during the match, all head injuries. He was treated for each one and allowed to play on. It was felt he was fit to play on as he had passed some checks. The video shows that this was not the case. He is seen prone on the ground, not moving on occasions and slow to get up. He is disorientated and is seen constantly holding his right side of his head. Some team mates came forward and made statements that Ben could not remember the score, even although it was a low scoring game. Other statements emerged saying that Ben was knocked out on an occasion.

The family had to have another funeral service when Ben’s Brain was returned to the family. Over the two and half years since his death we have had 2 funerals, 2 inquests and hours of heartache. Finally, on 4th September 2013, we got Ben’s death certificate stating that he had died of ‘Second Impact Syndrome’.

As a family we have a very simple message: we want concussion awareness introduced into the School curriculum. ‘It’s a life skill’

We want mandatory training for all coaches and referees. Players need to be aware, they need to look after each other – a buddy buddy system.

Sports organisations and Unions need to accept that concussion can be fatal. Don’t down play concussion.

Professionals Rugby players are sending out the wrong message in regard to return to play after a head injury.

My son left me a wonderful gift, that I was unaware of until his mum found it in his school jotter. He had written the following :

My Dad
I probably don’t think of him as much as I should,
but when I do I think of all the things
he has done for me.
I think of the endless drives up
to football and rugby matches, I think of all the camping trips,
events and treats organised for me and my
sister. I remember all the plane trips
and drives he’s had to take,
as he lives in Scotland,
just for me.
I know he will ring everyday
to check up on me and know how
I’m doing.
I know I can talk to him
about anything and everything and
that he will give me the right advice
even when I think I don’t need it.
And although he has gained some
weight over the years and he is a Man City fan
I still love him and he loves me.

Ben Robinson

Southcoast MA HS Senior Soccer Player Describes Her Experiences With Concussion

By Lindsey Santos

santosOn October 26th, 2010, I received my first concussion. During a competitive soccer game against one of our conference teams, I was jumping up for a header, pulled down, and then deliberately kicked in back of the head twice, blocking the third kick with my hand. I stood back up on my feet and knew something was wrong. I tried to “shake it off” as any other athlete is taught to do, but when I started throwing up, I jogged myself off the field. When I told my parents I had a headache later on when we arrived back home, they took me into the emergency room to get checked out. During that visit I was diagnosed with a concussion. Already knowing somewhat about concussions, I figured it would be a “normal” two weeks of headaches. Little did I know that two weeks would turn into three months.

I had headaches every day, and I constantly felt tired and confused. My goals had to be set aside to take care of my health. Not being able to go to school caused me to fall behind my peers in the classroom and on the field. After having my concussion for about four weeks, my doctor recommended I go to see a Sports Medicine Specialist at Boston Children’s Hospital. There, I took my first Impact Test. Even though I did well on it, my symptoms clearly showed that I still had a concussion. I followed up every month with him basically just asking questions about how I felt and keeping track of the symptoms. Finally being cleared back to sports in January of 2011, I returned to play basketball for my high school.

After only being cleared fully for a week and half, I received my second concussion. Someone set a pick on me and just completely elbowed me in the process. I immediately knew that I had a concussion because when I got up, I was dizzy and my vision was blurred. But, I stayed in the game because I didn’t want to accept the fact that it had happened. My coach took me out of the game because I was clearly “not right”. The trainer checked me out and held me from going back into the game. Waking up the next morning with a severe headache forced another trip back up to Boston Children’s Hospital.

It was just the same routine as last time- as if I was never cleared. This time the specialist advised that I come up with some sort of agreement with my teachers for help in the subjects that I wasn’t doing well in. My school principal developed a 504 plan that provided me with accommodations to get extra time to take tests and hand in projects. Some of my teachers weren’t aware of my condition though and some major assignments were counted against me. I felt like I didn’t have any control over my life as if a carpet was ripped out from under me. I started to write and draw to help me through my PCS (Post Concussive Syndrome) recovery. During all of this I was also losing my friends. When they would be out having fun, I was stuck at home with a headache crying myself to sleep. They would get mad when I told them I was going to stay home because I didn’t feel well. They started to believe I was faking this concussion to get away with things, like quarterlies, homework, and get-togethers.

After another three months had passed, I was cleared for contact sports again. I was feeling good and healthy, even with two concussions under my belt. Though things felt altered, I was learning to cope and accept it. I could not let my two concussions defeat me any longer. I had to face these obstacles head on and regain control of the things that mattered most in my life. Even though I am still dealing with headaches three years later and break down every once in awhile, I strive to make a difference. I introduced the Impact Test to my school and even though the athletes hate taking them, I know it can make a difference for the better. I also help other students in school who have a concussion. I guide them, and I’m most importantly a friend to them. I don’t want anyone to go through what I did. Going through these challenges has certainly had a large impact on my life. They have prepared me for other bumps in the road that I will face as I live the rest of my life.

What’s A Life Worth To You? The Absolute Importance Of Athletic Trainers In High School Sports

{Editor’s Note: I can think of no one better to speak to the need and value of Athletic Trainers in high school sports than someone whose life was literally saved on the playing field by an AT. Kevin Saum can claim that honor. Kevin is a Knockout Project Round Table member and his bio is available on this page .- Jay}

By Kevin Saum

saummudMore than 50% of high school students in the United States do not have the luxury of having an athletic trainer on the sidelines of their games and practices.  Yet athletic trainers are standard in collegiate and professional sports.  This reality is highly questionable considering that the underdeveloped, youth brain is at the greatest risk of injury.  In addition, studies have shown that young athletes take longer to heal from brain injuries, compared to the brains of more physically mature athletes. Why is it that school districts and policy makers are willing to implement safety changes AFTER a fatal, or near death incident occurs?  I often wonder what would have happened to me if Miss Barba were not on the sideline the night I was injured.  I venture to guess that you would not be reading this blog post.

After reading The Concussion Blog’s March 4th post, which recognized March as National Athletic Trainers month and encouraged readers to give a shout out to their favorite athletic trainers, one AT immediately came to mind.  Despite my lack of punctuality, I would like to recognize an Athletic Trainer at a high school, “set in the valley” in Chester, New Jersey.  Suzanne Barba, “Miss Barba” to all the students, is West Morris Central’s Athletic Trainer of thirty years, and not only mends bumps and bruises, but also touches the lives of every athlete she tapes, rehabs and teaches. Suzanne is also responsible for saving my life in a high school football game on October 5, 2007.  I do not remember very much from this night, but it is a night that undoubtedly changed my life forever.

As an athlete, one place you never want to be is in the athletic training room.  Being in this room either means you are out of the game, multiple games, the season, and possibly forever.  Just ask Alex Smith of the San Francisco 49ers, what happens when you go into this room.  Players would rather risk their long-term health and careers to stay out of this room, and look  where that got Robert Griffin III. I was a senior captain and a product of playing in a sports culture, which frequently glorified playing through injuries.   I naturally felt obligated to play injured in what was our team’s last chance to make a run for the playoffs.  In week two of the season, I sustained a separated shoulder, and Miss Barba tended to this injury for the few weeks leading up to my last game.  In the meantime, I strained the rotator cuff in the opposite shoulder, which instinctively left my head as the only blocking/tackling tool to use.  Naturally, like any competitor, I refused to let these ailments keep me off of the field.  However, after playing with these injuries and leading every hit I made with my head, I sustained a concussion. It should be noted that I was never officially diagnosed with a concussion, because I did not inform anyone about the excruciating headaches I was experiencing.  I never told a doctor, my parents, my coaches and certainly not Miss Barba.  She would never have let me play if she knew about my headache.

As I have alluded to previously on this blog, I unsuccessfully attempted to suppress the pain with four Advil and ran out under the glow of the Friday night lights for what turned out to be the very last time.  Just before halftime in this game I received a significant blow to the head, which left me unable to feel my legs.  With my history of chronic leg cramps in hot-weather games, everyone assumed it was just another cramp, as my teammates helped me to the sideline.  Because of Miss Barba’s experience as an EMT and Paramedic, she knew my condition was something much worse than leg cramps.  Upon recognizing my right-sided gaze, a common sign of a subdural hematoma (brain bleed), Miss Barba called for Advanced Life Support, and luckily a helicopter was in the area, on its way back from another call.  The doctor on the sideline was initially surprised by this request, until moments later, when I began to seize.  Miss Barba’s role did not stop at calling for appropriate medical attention.  She was also the one assisting my breathing with a bag valve mask when I went into respiratory failure, because of the brain swelling that ensued from second impact syndrome. The breathing assistance prevented brain damage and ultimately saved my life.

At that time, In 2007, Miss Barba was only a part-time athletic trainer because she was also responsible for teaching health classes during the day.  Due to a lack of time and resources, this work schedule prevented her from implementing baseline concussion testing and working with athletes to rehab their injuries.  Fortunately, in the year following my injury, Miss Barba was made our high school’s full-time athletic trainer.  Now, thanks to Miss Barba’s exceptional work and overwhelming support from parents, our school has a very thorough graduated return to play (RTP) protocol for its athletes.  This RTP process includes input from the strength and conditioning coach, to aid in implementing the graded physical activity protocol. Athletic trainers and strength coaches spend a lot of time with athletes, both during the season and in the offseason.  During this time they get to know the athletes personalities and ability levels.  They can identify when athletes are not acting like themselves, similar to how parents can, but in an athletic environment.   ATs specialize in diagnosing and treating injuries, while strength coaches have a great understanding of each individual athletes physical capabilities.  This collaboration between AT and Strength Coach, during the evaluation of an athlete’s RTP, allows for an appropriately stringent evaluation. The intricacies of Miss Barba’s RTP procedure meet, and I feel exceed, the standards set in place by the AmericanAcademy of neurology.  As a result, Suzanne believes that athletes feel safer and more confident returning to their sports, after passing this test.

On average, 12 football players die every year due to heart conditions, brain injuries and heat-related causes. Most of these deaths could be prevented with an AT overseeing athletic operations.  Athletic Trainers carry AEDs on the sidelines and could save the life of an athlete who has a heart condition.  Without ATs, concussions cannot be adequately managed due to conflicts of interest that exist in sport. Although athletic trainers have limited control in preventing brain injuries, other than educating athletes, nearly all brain injury related deaths could be avoided if concussions are managed properly.  On hot summer days, AT’s monitor the heat index and have the authority to cancel practice if conditions are too dangerous.  In addition, ATs ensure athletes are properly hydrated, which also prevents heat-related deaths.

Recently, the AmericanAcademy of Neurology published their updated return to play guidelines for concussions.  Most notably, they make the following recommendations:

  • The use of baseline testing.
  • Immediately removing a player from play when a concussion is suspected.
  • Individuals supervising the athletes should prohibit an athlete with concussion from returning to play until a Licensed Health Care Provider (LHCP) has judged that the concussion has been resolved.
  • Licensed Health Care Providers should develop individualized graded plans for return to physical and cognitive activity.

These recommendations are based on research and when implemented, they undoubtedly will make sports safer to play.  However, without the presence of an athletic trainer, their feasibility and intended efficiency are significantly hindered.  Not all parents can afford to take their children to LHCPs.  Who will recognize and remove an athlete from play when a potential concussion occurs?  The coaches? Who are trying to win a game and have a million other things and kids to worry about?  Wouldn’t that be a conflict of interest?  Where is the accountability in returning an athlete to play without an AT? Are coaches now going to be responsible for recording injuries and validating their athlete’s medical notes?  Are physicians going to be responsible for administering graded physical activity tests, with no prior knowledge of the individual’s abilities? All of these questions are answered when Athletic Trainers are looking after players.

Clearly, every athletic program would choose to have an Athletic Trainer if they were not faced by budget constraints.  I owe my life to an Athletic Trainer, which is why I am very passionate about the issue.  Considering all the statistics in regards to the dangers on the sports fields and the obvious safety and life saving benefits an athletic trainer brings, I ask the school districts, policy makers and parents, how much is a life worth to you?

Alex Smith Link:

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1426269-alex-smiths-benching-could-set-nfl-concussion-safety-back-for-decades?utm_term=NFL+Football&utm_content=NFL&utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter

RG III Link:

http://www.nbcwashington.com/news/sports/Shanahan-Wanted-to-Believe-RGIII-Could-Play-Injured-185822561.html

AmericanAcademy of Neurology Guidelines:

http://neurology.org/content/early/2013/03/15/WNL.0b013e31828d57dd.full.pdf+html

Twelve football players die every year:

http://vitals.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/04/05/17621060-12-school-football-players-die-each-year-study-finds?lite

 

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 Suzanne Barba takes care of Michael Burton, who currently plays fullback at Rutgers University

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I think she did a good job. Ed Mulholland/US Presswire Photo